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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of protection of the wounded, the sick and prisoners of war (POW) under Nigerian military law, being a paper delivered at the National Workshop on the Observance of Humanity in Warfare found in the catalog.

protection of the wounded, the sick and prisoners of war (POW) under Nigerian military law, being a paper delivered at the National Workshop on the Observance of Humanity in Warfare

Fa Mujakperuo

protection of the wounded, the sick and prisoners of war (POW) under Nigerian military law, being a paper delivered at the National Workshop on the Observance of Humanity in Warfare

by Fa Mujakperuo

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  • 14 Currently reading

Published by F. Mujakperuo in [Nigeria .
Written in English


Edition Notes

PRIORITY 2.

Statementby Fa Mujakperuo.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsIN PROCESS
The Physical Object
Pagination12 leaves ;
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL725185M
LC Control Number97113266

Thus, the wounded, the sick, the shipwrecked, and prisoners of war also require protection by law. The laws of war have found it difficult to keep up with rapid changes wrought by the development of ever-newer weapons and more technologically advanced warfare, with their attendant damage to . The Geneva Convention also defines the rights of wartime prisoners, established protections for the wounded and sick and established protection for civilians in and around a war zone.

The wounded and sick shall be collected and cared for. An impartial humanitarian body, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, may offer its services to the Parties to the conflict. GENERAL PROTECTION OF PRISONERS OF WAR. Article Prisoners of war are in the hands of the enemy Power, but not of the individuals or military. THE WOUNDED AND SICK IN ARMED FORCES IN THE FIELD OF 12 AUGUST CHAPTER I General Provisions OF PRISONERS OF WAR OF 12 AUGUST PART I General Provisions General Protection of Prisoners of War.

PRISONERS OF WAR AS INSTRUMENTS OF FOREIGN POLICY sick, wounded, and captured. One of the more important was the Treaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States and Prussia in The First Geneva Convention () was for increased protection for prisoners of war and the necessity of improving the.   The third Geneva Convention required that belligerents treat prisoners of war (PoWs) humanely, furnish information about them, and permit official visits to prison camps by representatives of neutral states. This came to be known as the Convention Relating to Treatment of Prisoners of War.


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Protection of the wounded, the sick and prisoners of war (POW) under Nigerian military law, being a paper delivered at the National Workshop on the Observance of Humanity in Warfare by Fa Mujakperuo Download PDF EPUB FB2

Protected persons is a legal term under international humanitarian law and refers to persons who are under specific protection of the Geneva Conventions, their Additional Protocols, and customary international humanitarian law during an armed conflict.

The legal definition of different categories of protected persons in armed conflicts is found in each Geneva Conventions and. “Prisoners of war” are combatants who have fallen into the hands of the enemy, or specific non-combatants to whom the status of prisoner of war is granted by international humanitarian law.

The following categories of persons are prisoners of war: members of the armed forces of a party to the conflict, including members of militias or volunteer corps forming part of such armed forces (this. The Geneva Conventions are rules that apply only in times of armed conflict and seek to protect people who are not or are no longer taking part in hostilities; these include the sick and wounded of armed forces on the field, wounded, sick, and shipwrecked members of armed forces at sea, prisoners of war, and first convention dealt with the treatment of wounded and sick armed.

The First and Second Geneva Conventions contain detailed legal regimes for the treatment of the wounded, sick and shipwrecked. This regime may be summarized, in the language of the Red Cross Movement, as a duty to ‘respect and protect’, i.e., a negative duty not to do harm and a positive obligation to take certain steps to assist the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked.

International Humanitarian Law (IHL) tries to protect the wounded, sick, prisoners of war and civilians in the hands of enemies.

Though IHL instruments seem to be comprehensive, they do not cover the full range of human suffering caused by war. War is not just a man’s business. In today’s conflicts, the impact of war on women can be severe. Wounded or sick prisoners of war who are suffering from certain serious injuries or diseases are entitled to special measures of protection under humanitarian law.

These provisions take into account the vulnerability and the risks of abuse faced by such seriously ill or injured persons, and the advantages that may be gained by treating them in. Respect, protection and care for the wounded, sick and shipwrecked, without any adverse distinction.

Introductory text. Wounded and sick are persons who are, because of trauma, disease or other physical or mental disorder or disability, in need of medical assistance.[] This covers equally new-born babies, maternity cases and other persons in immediate need of medical.

That protection is provided for in Common Article 3 and the First and Third Geneva Conventions (GC) relating to the treatment of the ‘wounded, sick and shipwrecked’ and ‘prisoners of war.

The Sick and Hurt Commissioners (also known as the Sick and Hurt Board, but formally and fully titled The Commissioners for taking Care of Sick and Wounded Seamen and for the Care and Treatment of Prisoners of War) were responsible for medical services in the Royal were a separate (but subsidiary) body to the Navy Board, supplying surgeons to naval ships, providing them.

PRISONERS OF WAR TABLE OF CONTENTS Page PREFACE ii CHAPTER 1. LAWS THAT APPLY TO PRISONERS OF WAR 1 cussions in this book, they will be referred to as deals'with the protection of sick and wounded soldiers oilland.

The second covers those atsea or shipwrecked. The third and most familiar. Azerbaijan’s Law concerning the Protection of Civilian Persons and the Rights of Prisoners of War () provides: “In international and non-international armed conflicts, at any time and especially after an engagement, all possible measures must be taken to protect the wounded and sick.

General Protection of Prisoners of War The wounded and sick shall be collected and cared for. An impartial humanitarian body, such as the International Committee of the Red Cross, may offer. The first two conventions elaborated on the principle that the sick and wounded have neutral status. The prisoner-of-war convention further developed the convention by requiring humane treatment, adequate feeding, and the delivery of relief supplies and by forbidding pressure on prisoners to supply more than a minimum of information.

the Treatment of Prisoners of War (GPW). Detained persons who are not protected under GWS and GPW may be protected under the provisions of the Geneva Convention Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War. The Geneva Convention for the Amelioration of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field states that.

of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armies in the Field and the Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (POW Convention) – proved capable of withstanding the test of time.1 This meagre record is in stark contrast to the wave of codification that followed in the wake of the – war.

It is the post In Book III, Volume 1 (Instruction of first-year trainee officers), the Teaching Manual provides: “Prisoners of war can be sick, traumatized or wounded.

In such cases, they must be evacuated and cared for by the friendly or enemy medical service at the front.”.

the wounded, sick, and shipwrecked as prisoners of war, providing they can be safely moved and that the warship has the facilities to care for them.

The Third Geneva Convention (The Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War of Aug ) The Third Geneva Convention sets out specific rules for. • prisoner-of-war processing company and the mili­ the Oondition of the Wounded and Sick in protection of the Geneva Oonvention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War until such time as their status has been determined by a competent tribunal.

RETAINED PERSONNEL. • In addition, if wounded or sick on the battlefield, the prisoner will receive help from the International Committee of the Red Cross. • Further, the use of PoWs as hostages or human shields. The first Geneva Convention was adopted in and provided for protection of sick and wounded soldiers on the field of battle.

The second convention, formulated inextended those protections to sailors wounded in sea battles. The third convention, inprotected prisoners of war. The Geneva Convention of 12 August that came into effect 71 year ago covers four categories: the Wounded and Sick; on land, the Shipwrecked; Prisoners of War; and the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War.

Three additional protocols have .The first commission appointed to oversee and organise the treatment of sick and wounded naval seamen and prisoners-of-war was appointed in With the imminent outbreak of war with the United Provinces in four new commissioners were appointed.are wounded, sick or shipwrecked, prisoners of war, and civilians, as well as medical personnel, military chaplains In “A Memory of Solferino,” his book about the experience, Dunant proposed that trained volunteer relief groups be granted protection during war in order to care for the wounded.

A group known as the Committee of Five.